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Journal Article

Intensity-resolved IR multiple photon ionization and fragmentation of C₆₀

MPS-Authors
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Fielicke,  André
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Helden,  Gert von
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Meijer,  Gerard
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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jcp_A09.11.0067.pdf
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Citation

Bakker, J. M., Lapoutre, V. J., Redlich, B., Oomens, J., Sartakov, B. G., Fielicke, A., et al. (2010). Intensity-resolved IR multiple photon ionization and fragmentation of C₆₀. The Journal of Chemical Physics, 132(7): 074305. doi:10.1063/1.3313926.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-F646-9
Abstract
The sequential absorption of multiple infrared (IR) photons by isolated gas-phase species can lead to their dissociation and/or ionization. Using the newly constructed ”Free Electron Laser for Intra-Cavity Experiments” (FELICE) beam line at the FELIX facility, neutral C₆₀ molecules have been exposed to an extremely high number ( ≈1023) of photons/cm² for a total time duration of up to 5 μs. At wavelengths around 20 μm, resonant with allowed IR transitions of C₆₀, ionization and
extensive fragmentation of the fullerenes is observed. The resulting photofragment distributions are attributed to absorption in fragmentation products formed once C₆₀ is excited to internal energies at which fragmentation or ionization takes place within the duration of the laser pulse. The
high IR intensities available combined with the large interaction volume permit spatially resolved detection of the ions inside the laser beam, thereby disentangling the contributions from different IR intensities. The use of spatial imaging reveals intensity dependent mass distributions that are
substantially narrower than what has been observed previously, indicating rather narrow energy distributions. A simple rate-equation modeling of the excitation process supports the experimental observations.