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Nitrogen-functionalized carbon nanotubes as a basic catalyst for biomass conversion reactions

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Tessonnier,  Jean-Philippe
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Villa,  Alberto
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Majoulet,  Olivier
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Su,  Dang Sheng
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons22071

Schlögl,  Robert
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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TessonnierNACS_1.pdf
(Preprint), 159KB

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Citation

Tessonnier, J.-P., Villa, A., Majoulet, O., Su, D. S., & Schlögl, R. (2009). Nitrogen-functionalized carbon nanotubes as a basic catalyst for biomass conversion reactions. Talk presented at 21st NAM (North American Catalysis Society Meeting). San Francisco, California [USA]. 2009-06-07 - 2009-06-12.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-F8F1-8
Abstract
Biomass conversion to transportation fuels and chemicals is a growing field of research due to the depletion of fossil fuels feedstock. New catalysts, optimized for carbohydrates conversion, need to be developed. In this context, basic heterogeneous catalysts will play a major role for dehydration, hydrolysis, (trans)esterification, aldol condensation, alkylation or isomerization reactions for example. In contrast to existing basic heterogeneous catalysts, MWCNTs-based catalysts are chemically stable (no leaching) and relatively easy to tailor on a nano- and macro-level (controlled porosity). Therefore, nitrogen-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (N-MWCNTs) appear to be a promising basic catalyst and catalyst support [1,2]. Unfortunately, the nitrogen concentration, its location in/on the nanotube and the nature of the formed N-containing functional groups are difficult to control by common synthesis techniques like by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) or by post-treatments [3]. In addition, it is still unclear which functional groups are required to reach high catalytic activities. Thus, we synthesized N-MWCNTs catalysts by grafting desired N-containing molecules on the MWCNTs’ surface. In order to avoid the drawbacks of the traditional SOCl2 route, a new procedure has been designed. The obtained catalysts have been tested in the transesterification of glyceryl tributyrate, as a model triglyceride for biodiesel synthesis