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The application of infrared spectroscopy to probe the surface morphology of alumina-supported palladium catalysts

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Bäumer,  Marcus
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Rupprechter,  Günther
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Freund,  Hans-Joachim
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Lear, T., Marshall, R., Lopez-Sanchez, J. A., Jackson, S. D., Klapötke, T. M., Bäumer, M., et al. (2005). The application of infrared spectroscopy to probe the surface morphology of alumina-supported palladium catalysts. The Journal of Chemical Physics, 123(17), 174706–1-174706–13. doi:10.1063/1.2101487.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-0720-1
Abstract
Five alumina-supported palladium catalysts have been prepared from a range of precursor compounds [palladium(II) nitrate, palladium(II) chloride, palladium(II) acetylacetonate, and tetraamminepalladium(II) tetraazidopalladate(II)] and at different metal loadings (1–7.3 wt %). Collectively, this series of catalysts provides a range of metal particle sizes (1.2–8.5 nm) that emphasize different morphological aspects of the palladium crystallites. The infrared spectra of chemisorbed CO applied under pulse-flow conditions reveal distinct groupings between metal crystallites dominated by low index planes and those that feature predominantly corner/edge atoms. Temperature-programmed infrared spectroscopy establishes that the linear CO band can be resolved into contributions from corner atoms and a combination of (111)/(111) and (111)/(100) particle edges. Propene hydrogenation has been used as a preliminary assessment of catalytic performance for the 1 wt % loaded catalysts, with the relative inactivity of the catalyst prepared from palladium(II) chloride attributed to a diminished hydrogen supply due to decoration of edge sites by chlorine originating from the preparative process. It is anticipated that refinements linking the vibrational spectrum of a probe molecule with surface structure and accessible adsorption sites for such a versatile catalytic substrate provide a platform against which structure/reactivity relationships can be usefully developed.