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Interfacial structure of water on Ru(001) investigated by vibrational spectroscopy

MPS-Authors
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Denzler,  Daniel N.
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Hess,  Christian
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Dudek,  Raymond
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Wagner,  Steffen
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Frischkorn,  Christian
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Wolf,  Martin
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Ertl,  Gerhard
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Denzler, D. N., Hess, C., Dudek, R., Wagner, S., Frischkorn, C., Wolf, M., et al. (2003). Interfacial structure of water on Ru(001) investigated by vibrational spectroscopy. Chemical Physics Letters, 376(5-6), 618-624. doi:10.1016/S0009-2614(03)01016-9.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-0F82-B
Abstract
In light of the controversial discussion of the interfacial structure of water on metal surfaces, adsorption of D2O on Ru(0 0 1) is investigated using sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy. In contrast to a recent theoretical study claiming partial dissociation of the first bilayer of water on Ru(0 0 1) [Science 295 (2002) 99], clear spectroscopic evidence is found that the adsorbed molecules remain intact. In the context of all experimental data available, a bilayer structure where every second water molecule exhibits a hydrogen–metal bond with a comparably large, proton-disordered unit cell seems most plausible.