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Zeitschriftenartikel

Some twists and turns in the path of improving surface activity

MPG-Autoren
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Papathanasiou,  Athanasios G.
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Wolff,  Janpeter
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Kevrekidis,  Ioannis G.
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Rotermund,  Harm H.
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Ertl,  Gerhard
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Papathanasiou, A. G., Wolff, J., Kevrekidis, I. G., Rotermund, H. H., & Ertl, G. (2002). Some twists and turns in the path of improving surface activity. Chemical Physics Letters, 358(5-6), 407-412.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-14AE-4
Zusammenfassung
The average reactivity of a catalytic surface was appreciably enhanced through spatio-temporally variable operation. Computer steering of a focused laser beam allowed the realization of controlled temperature profiles and their interaction with intrinsic system (reaction/transport) time and space scales. Real-time monitoring of the product concentration then enabled the exploration/implementation of strategies towards optimizing the overall reaction rate. The ability to dictate reaction conditions in space and time, whether in open or in closed loop [1, 2 and 3] [Science 292 (2001) 1357; Nature 361 (1993) 240; Science 294 (2001) 134], opens new directions for reaction control (e.g., of activity and selectivity in more complex reaction networks) through the combination of chemistry and systems theory.