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Microstructural parcellation of the human cerebral cortex: From Brodmann's post-mortem map to in vivo mapping with high-field magnetic resonance imaging

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Geyer,  Stefan
Department Neurophysics, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Weiss,  Marcel
Department Neurophysics, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Reimann,  Katja
Department Neurophysics, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Lohmann,  Gabriele
Department Neurophysics, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Turner,  Robert
Department Neurophysics, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Geyer, S., Weiss, M., Reimann, K., Lohmann, G., & Turner, R. (2011). Microstructural parcellation of the human cerebral cortex: From Brodmann's post-mortem map to in vivo mapping with high-field magnetic resonance imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 5: 19. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2011.00019.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-28AF-C
Abstract
The year 2009 marked the 100th anniversary of the publication of the famous brain map of Korbinian Brodmann. Although a “classic” guide to microanatomical parcellation of the cerebral cortex, it is – from today’s state-of-the-art neuroimaging perspective – problematic to use Brodmann’s map as a structural guide to functional units in the cortex. In this article we discuss some of the reasons, especially the problematic compatibility of the “post-mortem world” of microstructural brain maps with the “in vivo world” of neuroimaging. We conclude with some prospects for the future of in vivo structural brain mapping: a new approach which has the enormous potential to make direct correlations between microstructure and function in living human brains: “in vivo Brodmann mapping” with high-field magnetic resonance imaging.