English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Top-down and bottom-up contributions to understanding sentences describing objects in motion

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons19952

Rueschemeyer,  Shirley-Ann
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Donders Centre for Cognition, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands;

/persons/resource/persons19872

Mueller,  Karsten
Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19643

Friederici,  Angela D.
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)

Rueschemeyer_2010.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Rueschemeyer, S.-A., Glenberg, A. M., Kaschak, M. P., Mueller, K., & Friederici, A. D. (2010). Top-down and bottom-up contributions to understanding sentences describing objects in motion. Frontiers in Psychology, 1: 183. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2010.00183.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-5707-8
Abstract
Theories of embodied language comprehension propose that the neural systems used for perception, action, and emotion are also engaged during language comprehension. Consistent with these theories, behavioral studies have shown that the comprehension of language that describes motion is affected by simultaneously perceiving a moving stimulus (Kaschak et al., 2005). In two neuroimaging studies, we investigate whether comprehension of sentences describing moving objects activates brain areas known to support the visual perception of moving objects (i.e., area MT/V5). Our data indicate that MT/V5 is indeed selectively engaged by sentences describing objects in motion toward the comprehender compared to sentences describing visual scenes without motion. Moreover, these sentences activate areas along the cortical midline of the brain, known to be engaged when participants process self-referential information. The current data thus suggest that sentences describing situations with potential relevance to one's own actions activate both higher-order visual cortex as well brain areas involved in processing information about the self. The data have consequences for embodied theories of language comprehension: first, they show that perceptual brain areas support sentential-semantic processing. Second the data indicate that sensory-motor simulation of events described through language are susceptible to top-down modulation of factors such as relevance of the described situation to the self.