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Fragmentation Pathways of H+(H2O)2 after Extreme Ultraviolet Photoionization

MPG-Autoren
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Lammich,  L.
Division Prof. Dr. Klaus Blaum, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Jordon-Thaden,  B.
Division Prof. Dr. Klaus Blaum, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Ullrich,  J.
Division Prof. Dr. Joachim H. Ullrich, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Pedersen,  H. B.
Prof. Dirk Schwalm, Emeriti, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Wolf,  A.
Division Prof. Dr. Klaus Blaum, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Lammich, L., Domesle, C., Jordon-Thaden, B., Förstel, M., Arion, T., Lischke, T., et al. (2010). Fragmentation Pathways of H+(H2O)2 after Extreme Ultraviolet Photoionization. Physical Review Letters, 105(25): 253003, pp. 1-4. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.253003.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-6F9E-2
Zusammenfassung
Photofragmentation of the protonated water dimer H+(H2O)2, a fundamental system both in aqueous solutions and gas-phase water clusters, has been studied at 13.8 nm using the Free Electron Laser FLASH in Hamburg. In a crossed-beam experiment using time-resolved, single-molecule fragment imaging, the two-body breakup into H2O++H3O+ was found as a prominent fragmentation channel with a kinetic energy release of up to 10 eV. This channel was observed with at least a similar yield as events with stronger fragmentation, producing protons together with neutral fragments and showing an absolute cross section of (0.5±0.2)×10-18  cm2.