English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Conference Paper

Ultrapure gases - From the Production Plant to the Laboratory

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons31050

Simgen,  H.
Division Prof. Dr. Manfred Lindner, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons31217

Zuzel,  G.
Division Prof. Dr. Manfred Lindner, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Simgen, H., & Zuzel, G. (2006). Ultrapure gases - From the Production Plant to the Laboratory. In P. Loaiza (Ed.), Topical workshop on low radioactivitytechniques: LRT 2006 (pp. 45-50). American Institute of Physics.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-7F36-B
Abstract
Radioactive noble gas isotopes are a potential source of background in low-level physics experiments, since they are present in the atmosphere and also in widely used gases produced from the atmosphere. We have studied the 39Ar, 85Kr and 222Rn contamination of commercially available nitrogen using low background proportional counters and a rare gas mass spectrometer. It was found that air separation plants are very effective in removing traces of radioactive noble gases and that the available purity can be significantly higher than commercial specifications. On the other hand the gas handling processes which are necessary to deliver gases from the production plant to the customer are a possible source of re-contaminations and determine in most cases the achievable purity. By simulating these processes under realistic conditions we have establish together with the Italian company 'SOL group' a well controlled delivery path which can hold the purity. For the short-lived 222Rn the initial contamination is less critical, because it decays away. Instead the emanation rate of the cryogenic tank was found to determine the achievable purity, since it permanently delivers new 222Rn.