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Cassini Dust Measurements at Enceladus and Implications for the Origin of the E Ring

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Kempf,  Sascha
Ralf Srama - Heidelberg Dust Group, Research Groups, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Srama,  Ralf
Ralf Srama - Heidelberg Dust Group, Research Groups, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Dikarev,  Valeri
Ralf Srama - Heidelberg Dust Group, Research Groups, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Helfert,  Stefan
Ralf Srama - Heidelberg Dust Group, Research Groups, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Moragas-Klostermeyer,  Georg
Ralf Srama - Heidelberg Dust Group, Research Groups, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Grün,  Eberhard
Ralf Srama - Heidelberg Dust Group, Research Groups, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Spahn, F., Schmidt, J., Albers, N., Hörning, M., Makuch, M., Seiß, M., et al. (2006). Cassini Dust Measurements at Enceladus and Implications for the Origin of the E Ring. Science, 311(5766), 1416-1418. doi:10.1126/science.1121375.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-807D-8
Abstract
During Cassini's close flyby of Enceladus on 14 July 2005, the High Rate Detector of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer registered micron-sized dust particles enveloping this satellite. The dust impact rate peaked about 1 minute before the closest approach of the spacecraft to the moon. This asymmetric signature is consistent with a locally enhanced dust production in the south polar region of Enceladus. Other Cassini experiments revealed evidence for geophysical activities near Enceladus' south pole: a high surface temperature and a release of water gas. Production or release of dust particles related to these processes may provide the dominant source of Saturn's E ring.