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Observation of the microquasar LS 5039 with H.E.S.S.

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de Naurois,  M.
Division Prof. Dr. Werner Hofmann, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Dubus,  G.
Division Prof. Dr. Werner Hofmann, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Funk,  S.
Division Prof. Dr. Werner Hofmann, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Rowell,  G.
Division Prof. Dr. Werner Hofmann, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

de Naurois, M., Dubus, G., Funk, S., Rowell, G., & Chadwick, P. M. (2005). Observation of the microquasar LS 5039 with H.E.S.S. In B. S. Acharya, S. Gupta, P. Jagadeesan, A. Jain, S. Karthikeyan, S. Morris, et al. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference (pp. 101-104). Navy Nagar, Colaba, Mumbai, MH-400005: Tata Institute of Fundamental Research.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-87B9-A
Abstract
Radio and X-ray observations have led to the presumption that some X-ray binaries (XRB) called microquasars behave as scaled down active galactic nuclei. Several models predict detectable emission of such objects by atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes above 100 GeV. LS 5039 is one of the two microquasars possibly associated with an EGRET source, and it exhibits strong radio and X-rays emission presumably associated with a relativistic jet, making it the most promising candidate for GeV-TeV emission. LS 5039 is located in the Southern Hemisphere in a region that was scanned in the summer of 2004 by the High Energy Stereoscopic System. Dedicated follow-up observations are planned for the summer of 2005. Results of these two observation campaigns are presented.