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Optical dating of granitic stone surfaces

MPG-Autoren
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Greilich,  S.
Guest Group Archaeometry, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Glasmacher,  U.A.
Guest Group Archaeometry, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Wagner,  G.A.
Guest Group Archaeometry, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Greilich, S., Glasmacher, U., & Wagner, G. (2005). Optical dating of granitic stone surfaces. Archaeometry, 47(3), 645-665.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-8874-7
Zusammenfassung
A novel luminescence methodology for dating surfaces of granitoid rocks is presented, with encouraging results for archaeological stone structures. It is based on the zeroing of the latent signal of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in feldspar and quartz grains of the stone surface during exposure to daylight. When after bleaching the surface is shielded from light, the OSL signal builds up again, such that its intensity provides an age for the event of the last exposure to light. This event could be the construction or the destruction of stone structures or, for example, sedimentary deposition of granitic boulders, such as in fan deposits. The experimental approach utilizes a high spatial resolution detection technique (HR-OSL) for OSL of minerals that are left in their original petrological context; that is, without any mineral separation. With this approach, steep gradients in microdosimetry at the surface and at grain boundaries become important and are discussed in detail. The new dating technique is successfully applied to a stone wall of the medieval castle of Lindenfels in southwestern Germany and the pre-Columbian Nasca lines (geoglyphs) around Palpa in southern Peru.