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Low-frequency-field-induced spontaneous-emission interference in a two-level atom placed in an anisotropic photonic crystal

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Li,  Gao-xiang
Division Prof. Dr. Christoph H. Keitel, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Evers,  Jörg
Division Prof. Dr. Christoph H. Keitel, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Keitel,  Christoph Helmut
Division Prof. Dr. Christoph H. Keitel, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Li, G.-x., Evers, J., & Keitel, C. H. (2005). Low-frequency-field-induced spontaneous-emission interference in a two-level atom placed in an anisotropic photonic crystal. Journal of Physics B-Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics, 38(10), 1435-1451.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-8902-E
Abstract
We investigate the spontaneous-emission properties of a two-level atom embedded in a three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal. In addition to the modified density of states, the atom is driven by a coherent intense low-frequency field (LFF), which creates additional multiphoton decay channels with the exchange of two low-frequency photons and one spontaneous photon during an atomic transition. Due to the low frequency of the applied field, the various transition pathways may interfere with each other and thus give rise to a modified system dynamics. We find that even if all the atomic (bare and induced) transition frequencies are in the conducting band of the photonic crystal, there still may exist a photon–atom bound state in coexistence with propagating modes. The system also allows us to generate narrow lines in the spontaneous-emission spectrum. This spectrum is a function of the distance of the observer from the atom due to the band gap in the photonic crystal. The system properties depend on three characteristic frequencies, which are influenced by quantum interference effects. Thus these results can be attributed to a combination of interference and band-gap effects.