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Journal Article

Great apes’ risk-taking strategies in a decision making task

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Haun,  Daniel B. M.
Comparative Cognitive Anthropology, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany;
Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, United Kingdom;

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Haun_Suppl_Material_journal.pone.0028801.s001.doc
(Supplementary material), 92KB

Citation

Haun, D. B. M., Nawroth, C., & Call, J. (2011). Great apes’ risk-taking strategies in a decision making task. PLoS One, 6(12), e28801. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0028801.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-A06D-E
Abstract
We investigate decision-making behaviour in all four non-human great ape species. Apes chose between a safe and a risky option across trials of varying expected values. All species chose the safe option more often with decreasing probability of success. While all species were risk-seeking, orangutans and chimpanzees chose the risky option more often than gorillas and bonobos. Hence all four species' preferences were ordered in a manner consistent with normative dictates of expected value, but varied predictably in their willingness to take risks.