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When two newly-acquired words are one: New words differing in stress alone are not automatically represented differently

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McQueen,  James M.
Language Comprehension Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Centre for Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands ;
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;

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Citation

Sulpizio, S., & McQueen, J. M. (2011). When two newly-acquired words are one: New words differing in stress alone are not automatically represented differently. In Proceedings of the 12th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association (Interspeech 2011), Florence, Italy (pp. 1385-1388).


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-F256-5
Abstract
Do listeners use lexical stress at an early stage in word learning? Artificial-lexicon studies have shown that listeners can learn new spoken words easily. These studies used non-words differing in consonants and/or vowels, but not differing only in stress. If listeners use stress information in word learning, they should be able to learn new words that differ only in stress (e.g., BInulo-biNUlo). We investigated this issue here. When learning new words, Italian listeners relied on segmental information; they did not take stress information into account. Newly-acquired words differing in stress alone are not automatically represented as different words.