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Variations of vertical velocity in the deep oceans simulated by 1/10 degree OGCM

MPG-Autoren
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von Storch,  J.-S.
The Ocean in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;
Ocean Statistics, The Ocean in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

von Storch, J.-S. (2010). Variations of vertical velocity in the deep oceans simulated by 1/10 degree OGCM. Ocean Dynamics, 60, 759-770. doi:10.1007/s10236-010-0303-5.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-F679-8
Zusammenfassung
This paper analyzes variations of vertical velocity w simulated by the 1/10° Ocean General Circulation Model for the Earth Simulator (OFES). Strong w-variability is found in the deep oceans. When w is WKBJ-normalized, the standard deviation averaged over the Southern Ocean increases with depth and is larger than 8 × 10- 3 cm/s throughout the water column below 1,500 m. Evidences are presented that link this w-variability to internal waves generated by quasi-steady currents over topography. The aliasing errors in lag-3-day correlations suggest a bottom generation of near-inertial waves. A scale analysis indicates that vertically propagating waves that can be resolved by the OFES model are waves with frequencies of the order of inertial frequency and wavelengths comparable to the order of the grid size. The vertical energy flux associated with these waves is substantial. When integrated globally, the vertical energy flux is upward in the upper 4 km and reaches maximum values of about 0.8 TW at about 1 to 2 km depth. Thus, the w-variability in the 1/10° OFES integration points not only to a strong bottom generation of near-inertial internal waves in the deep Southern Ocean but also to the possibility that the power provided by internal waves generated by non-tidal currents over topography can be comparable to the power provided by internal waves generated by tidal flows over topography.