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Long-term variability in mesopause region temperatures over Fort Collins, Colorado (41 degrees N, 105 degrees W) based on lidar observations from 1990 through 2007

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Schmidt,  H.
The Atmosphere in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;
Middle and Upper Atmosphere, The Atmosphere in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

She, C. Y., Krueger, D. A., Akmaev, R., Schmidt, H., Talaat, E., & Yee, S. (2009). Long-term variability in mesopause region temperatures over Fort Collins, Colorado (41 degrees N, 105 degrees W) based on lidar observations from 1990 through 2007. Journal of Atmospheric & Solar-Terrestrial Physics, 71, 1558-1564.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-F792-6
Abstract
During 1990-2007, there were 894 lidar observations of nocturnal mesopause region temperatures over Fort Collins, Colorado. In an earlier analysis with data to April 1997, an unexpected episodic warming, peaking in 1993 with a maximum value over 10 K, was reported and attributed to the Mount Pinatubo eruption in June 1991. With all data, long-term temperature trends from a 7-parameter linear regression analysis including solar cycle effect and long-term trends leads to a cooling of as much as 6.8 K/decade at similar to 100 km, consistent with some reported observations but larger than model predictions. Including the observed episodic warming response in an 11-parameter nonlinear regression analysis reduces the maximum long-term cooling trends to similar to 1.5 K/decade at 91 km, with magnitude and altitude dependences consistent with the prediction of two models, Spectral Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere Model (SMLTM) and Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA). In addition, the mid-latitude middle-atmospheric response to solar flux variability in Thermosphere-Ionosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED)/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) temperatures is presented.