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A fate and transport ocean model for persistent organic pollutants and its application to the North Sea

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Ilyina,  T.
The Ocean in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;
Ocean Biogeochemistry, The Ocean in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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Lammel,  G.
Climate Processes, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Ilyina, T., Pohlmann, T., Lammel, G., & Sündermann, J. (2006). A fate and transport ocean model for persistent organic pollutants and its application to the North Sea. Journal of Marine Systems, 63, 1-19. doi:10.1016/j.jmarsys.2006.04.007.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-FD4F-E
Abstract
The fate and transport ocean model (FANTOM) aimed to study the fate of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the North Sea has been developed. The main focus of the model is on quantifying the distribution of POPs and their aquatic pathways within the North Sea. Key processes are 3D transport of POPs with ocean currents, diffusive air-sea exchange, wet and dry atmospheric depositions, phase partitioning, degardation, and net sedimentation in bottom sediments. This is the first time that a spatially resolved, measurements based ocean transport model is used to study POP-like substances. The model was applied for the North Sea and tested to study γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH, lindane) behaviour in sea water in the years 1995-2001. Concentrations of γ-HCH and its fluxes between upper sediment, sea and atmosphere were modeled, based on discharge and emission estimates available through various monitoring programmes. The model results were evaluated against measurements. The predicted γ-HCH concentrations show good agreement with the observations, reproducing the spatial distribution and a downward trend of γ-HCH in the entire North Sea during the simulation period. The correlation between the model results and measurements is better during warmer seasons suggesting the importance of the temperature dependence of the air-sea exchange.