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Journal Article

The significance of the grasshopper effect on the atmospheric distribution of persistent organic substances

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Semeena,  V. S.
Climate Processes, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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Lammel,  Gerhard
Climate Processes, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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GRL_32-L07804.pdf
(Publisher version), 185KB

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Citation

Semeena, V. S., & Lammel, G. (2005). The significance of the grasshopper effect on the atmospheric distribution of persistent organic substances. Geophysical Research Letters, 32(7): L07804. doi:10.1029/2004GL022229,.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0011-FF04-4
Abstract
Slowly degradable, semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) may undergo more than one volatilization-transport-deposition cycle through the atmosphere (multi-hopping). The significance of this process for the potential for long-range transport (LRT) is addressed for the first time. We use a multicompartment model which in turn is based on a general circulation model. The results suggest that both transport by single-hopping and multi-hopping contribute significantly to LRT of DDT and γ-HCH (lindane) and to accumulation in high latitudes. A larger fraction of the molecules transported by multi-hopping than of the molecules transported by single-hopping is deposited to the world's oceans. Multi-hopping prevails in the boundary layer far from the source regions. However, single-hopping contributes an almost equal amount to the deposition of DDT and γ-HCH in the Arctic.