English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Heterogeneous nucleation as a potential sulphate-coating mechanism of atmospheric mineral dust particles and implications of coated dust on new particle formation

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons37356

Timmreck,  Claudia
The Atmosphere in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;
Middle and Upper Atmosphere, The Atmosphere in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

jgrd10643.pdf
(Publisher version), 571KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Korhonen, H., Napari, I., Timmreck, C., Vehkamaki, H., Pirjola, L., Lehtinen, K. E. J., et al. (2003). Heterogeneous nucleation as a potential sulphate-coating mechanism of atmospheric mineral dust particles and implications of coated dust on new particle formation. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 108(D17): 4546. doi:10.1029/2003JD003553.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-015B-4
Abstract
The plausibility of heterogeneous conucleation of water, sulphuric acid, and ammonia as a pathway leading to soluble coating of atmospheric mineral dust is investigated. In addition, the effect of such sulphate-coated dust on the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles is addressed. The simulated new particle formation mechanism is ternary nucleation of water, sulphuric acid, and ammonia vapors, while in the condensational growth process the effect of condensable organic vapor is also studied. The results indicate that soluble coating of dust by heterogeneous nucleation can occur at atmospheric sulphuric acid concentrations. In addition, the simulations show that homogeneous ternary nucleation and subsequent growth are decoupled. Although observed ( or even higher) dust concentrations are unable to inhibit new particle formation, coated dust particles acting as condensation and coagulation sinks can prevent the growth of newly formed particles to detectable sizes. This is particularly true in desert areas, where organic vapor concentrations are low.