English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Dietary history contributes to enterotype-like clustering and functional metagenomic content in the intestinal microbiome of wild mice

Wang, J., Linnenbrink, M., Künzel, S., Fernandes, R., Nadeau, M.-J., Rosenstiel, P., et al. (2014). Dietary history contributes to enterotype-like clustering and functional metagenomic content in the intestinal microbiome of wild mice. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(26), E2703-E2710. doi:10.1073/pnas.1402342111.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0019-F625-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0019-F627-0
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Wang_2014.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
Name:
Wang_2014.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Wang, Jun1, Author              
Linnenbrink, Miriam2, Author              
Künzel, Sven2, Author              
Fernandes, Ricardo, Author
Nadeau, Marie-Josée, Author
Rosenstiel, Philip, Author
Baines, John F.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Guest Group Evolutionary Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445638              
2Department Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445635              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Understanding the origins of gut microbial community structure is critical for the identification and interpretation of potential fitnessrelated traits for the host. The presence of community clusters characterized by differences in the abundance of signature taxa, referred to as enterotypes, is a debated concept first reported in humans and later extended to other mammalian hosts. In this study, we provide a thorough assessment of their existence in wild house mice using a panel of evaluation criteria.We identify support for two clusters that are compositionally similar to clusters identified in humans, chimpanzees, and laboratory mice, characterized by differences in Bacteroides, Robinsoniella, and unclassified genera belonging to the family Lachnospiraceae. To further evaluate these clusters, we (i) monitored community changes associated with moving mice from the natural to a laboratory environment, (ii) performed functional metagenomic sequencing, and (iii) subjected wild-caught samples to stable isotope analysis to reconstruct dietary patterns. This process reveals differences in the proportions of genes involved in carbohydrate versus protein metabolism in the functional metagenome, as well as differences in plant- versus meat-derived food sources between clusters. In conjunction with wild-caught mice quickly changing their enterotype classification upon transfer to a standard laboratory chow diet, these results provide strong evidence that dietary history contributes to the presence of enterotype-like clustering in wild mice.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-02-062014-04-252014-052014-07-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1402342111
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  Other : Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: National Academy of Sciences
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 111 (26) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: E2703 - E2710 Identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424 (print)
ISSN: 1091-6490 (online)
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925427230