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  Eighteen-month-olds’ memory interference and distraction in a modified A-not-B task is not associated with their anticipatory looking in a false-belief task

Zmyj, N., Prinz, W., & Daum, M. M. (2015). Eighteen-month-olds’ memory interference and distraction in a modified A-not-B task is not associated with their anticipatory looking in a false-belief task. Frontiers in Psychology, 6: 857. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00857.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-A6D6-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7A67-1
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Zmyj, Norbert1, Author
Prinz, Wolfgang2, Author              
Daum, Moritz M.3, Author              
Affiliations:
1TU Dortmund, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
3Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: False belief task; Memory interference; Infancy; Distraction; Inhibitory control
 Abstract: Infants’ performance in non-verbal false-belief tasks is often interpreted as if they have understood false beliefs. This view has been questioned by a recent account that explains infants’ performance in non-verbal false-belief tasks as the result of susceptibility to memory interference and distraction. We tested this alternative account by investigating the relationship between infants’ false-belief understanding, susceptibility to memory interference and distraction, and general cognitive development in 18-month-old infants (N = 22). False-belief understanding was tested in an anticipatory looking paradigm of a standard false-belief task. Susceptibility to memory interference and distraction was tested in a modified A-not-B task. Cognitive development was measured via the Mental Scale of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. We did not find any relationship between infants’ performance in the false-belief task and the A-not-B task, even after controlling for cognitive development. This study shows that there is no ubiquitous relation between susceptibility to memory interference and distraction and performance in a false-belief task in infancy.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-11-032015-06-092015-06-22
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00857
PMID: 26157409
PMC: PMC4475791
Other: eCollection 2015
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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 Sequence Number: 857 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078