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  Aging affects adaptation to sound-level statistics in human auditory cortex

Herrmann, B., Maess, B., & Johnsrude, I. S. (2018). Aging affects adaptation to sound-level statistics in human auditory cortex. The Journal of Neuroscience, 38(8), 1989-1999. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1489-17.2018.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-B9E9-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-E24D-7
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Herrmann, Björn1, Author
Maess, Burkhard2, Author              
Johnsrude, Ingrid S.1, 3, Author
Affiliations:
1Brain and Mind Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada, ou_persistent22              
2Methods and Development Group MEG and EEG - Cortical Networks and Cognitive Functions, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_2205650              
3School of Communication Sciences & Disorders, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Aging; Auditory cortex; Magnetoencephalography; Neural adaptation; Stimulus statistics
 Abstract: Optimal perception requires efficient and adaptive neural processing of sensory input. Neurons in nonhuman mammals adapt to the statistical properties of acoustic feature distributions such that they become sensitive to sounds that are most likely to occur in the environment. However, whether human auditory responses adapt to stimulus statistical distributions and how aging affects adaptation to stimulus statistics is unknown. We used MEG to study how exposure to different distributions of sound levels affects adaptation in auditory cortex of younger (mean: 25 years; n = 19) and older (mean: 64 years; n = 20) adults (male and female). Participants passively listened to two sound-level distributions with different modes (either 15 or 45 dB sensation level). In a control block with long interstimulus intervals, allowing neural populations to recover from adaptation, neural response magnitudes were similar between younger and older adults. Critically, both age groups demonstrated adaptation to sound-level stimulus statistics, but adaptation was altered for older compared with younger people: in the older group, neural responses continued to be sensitive to sound level under conditions in which responses were fully adapted in the younger group. The lack of full adaptation to the statistics of the sensory environment may be a physiological mechanism underlying the known difficulty that older adults have with filtering out irrelevant sensory information.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-01-042017-05-292018-01-142018-02-21
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1489-17.2018
PMID: 29358362
Other: Epub 2018
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : MOP133450
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : Postdoctoral Fellowship Award
Funding organization : Brain and Mind Institute at the University of Western Ontario

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Title: The Journal of Neuroscience
  Other : J. Neurosci.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Baltimore, MD : The Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 38 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1989 - 1999 Identifier: ISSN: 0270-6474
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925502187