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  The MinDE system is a generic spatial cue for membrane protein distribution in vitro

Ramm, B., Glock, P., Mücksch, J., Blumhardt, P., Garcia-Soriano, D., Heymann, M., et al. (2018). The MinDE system is a generic spatial cue for membrane protein distribution in vitro. Nature Communications, 9: 3942. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-06310-1.

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 Creators:
Ramm, Beatrice1, Author              
Glock, Philipp1, Author              
Mücksch, Jonas1, Author              
Blumhardt, Philipp1, Author              
Garcia-Soriano, Daniela1, Author              
Heymann, Michael1, Author              
Schwille, Petra1, Author              
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1Schwille, Petra / Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1565169              

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Free keywords: Molecular biophysics; Synthetic biology
 Abstract: The E. coli MinCDE system has become a paradigmatic reaction–diffusion system in biology. The membrane-bound ATPase MinD and ATPase-activating protein MinE oscillate between the cell poles followed by MinC, thus positioning the main division protein FtsZ at midcell. Here we report that these energy-consuming MinDE oscillations may play a role beyond constraining MinC/FtsZ localization. Using an in vitro reconstitution assay, we show that MinDE self-organization can spatially regulate a variety of functionally completely unrelated membrane proteins into patterns and gradients. By concentration waves sweeping over the membrane, they induce a direct net transport of tightly membrane-attached molecules. That the MinDE system can spatiotemporally control a much larger set of proteins than previously known, may constitute a MinC-independent pathway to division site selection and chromosome segregation. Moreover, the here described phenomenon of active transport through a traveling diffusion barrier may point to a general mechanism of spatiotemporal regulation in cells.

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 Dates: 2018
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-06310-1
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Title: Nature Communications
  Abbreviation : Nat. Commun.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 Sequence Number: 3942 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2041-1723