English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Evolution of mating types in finite populations: the precarious advantage of being rare

Czuppon, P., & Rogers, D. W. (2018). Evolution of mating types in finite populations: the precarious advantage of being rare. bioRxiv. doi:10.1101/400598.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7013-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7014-8
Genre: Paper

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
400598.full.pdf (Preprint), 885KB
Name:
400598.full.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show
hide
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Czuppon, Peter1, Author              
Rogers, David W.2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445641              
2Department Microbial Population Biology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_2421699              
3Max-Planck Research Group Experimental Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445640              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Sexually reproducing populations with self-incompatibility bear the cost of limiting potential mates to individuals of a different type. Rare mating types escape this cost since they are unlikely to encounter incompatible partners, leading to the deterministic prediction of continuous invasion by new mutants and an ever increasing number of types. However, rare types are also at an increased risk of being lost by random drift. Calculating the number of mating types that a population can maintain requires consideration of both the deterministic advantages and the stochastic risks. By comparing the relative importance of selection and drift, we show that a population of size N can maintain a maximum of approximately N 1/3 mating types. Although the number of mating types in a population is quite stable, the rare type advantage promotes turnover of types. We derive explicit formulas for both the invasion and turnover probabilities in finite populations. Being vanishingly rare is thus a blessing and a curse associated with both universal compatibility and a high risk of extinction.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-08-262018-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: No review
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1101/400598
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: bioRxiv
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: 400598 Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: -