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  Paleo-ENSO influence on African environments and early modern humans

Kaboth-Bahr, S., Gosling, W. D., Vogelsang, R., Bahr, A., Scerri, E. M. L., Asrat, A., et al. (2021). Paleo-ENSO influence on African environments and early modern humans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 118(23): e2018277118, pp. 1-6. doi:10.1073/pnas.2018277118.

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 Creators:
Kaboth-Bahr, Stefanie, Author
Gosling, William D., Author
Vogelsang, Ralf, Author
Bahr, André, Author
Scerri, Eleanor M. L.1, 2, Author              
Asrat, Asfawossen, Author
Cohen, Andrew S., Author
Düsing, Walter, Author
Foerster, Verena, Author
Lamb, Henry F., Author
Maslin, Mark A., Author
Roberts, Helen M., Author
Schäbitz, Frank, Author
Trauth, Martin H., Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              
2Lise Meitner Pan-African Evolution Research Group, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_3033582              

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Free keywords: African paleoclimate, hominin evolution, Walker and Hadley circulation, orbital forcing
 Abstract: Our results identify the prime driver of climate variation in Africa’s low latitudes over the past 620 ky—the key time frame for the evolution of our species. Warming and cooling of the tropical Pacific Ocean paced by insolation changes modulated the tropical Walker circulation, driving opposing wet–dry states in eastern and western Africa. We show that the effects of glacial/interglacial cycles were not the predominant source of environmental change in most of the continent. Africa’s environmental patchwork driven by low-latitude climate processes should therefore be a critical component in conceptual models of human evolution and early demography over the past 620 ky.In this study, we synthesize terrestrial and marine proxy records, spanning the past 620 ky, to decipher pan-African climate variability and its drivers and potential linkages to hominin evolution. We find a tight correlation between moisture availability across Africa to El Niño Southern Ocean oscillation (ENSO) variability, a manifestation of the Walker Circulation, that was most likely driven by changes in Earth’s eccentricity. Our results demonstrate that low-latitude insolation was a prominent driver of pan-African climate change during the Middle to Late Pleistocene. We argue that these low-latitude climate processes governed the dispersion and evolution of vegetation as well as mammals in eastern and western Africa by increasing resource-rich and stable ecotonal settings thought to have been important to early modern humans.All study data are included in the article and/or supporting information.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-06-012021-06-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 6
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Results
Discussion
Conclusion
Materials and Methods
- pwPCA.
- Breakpoint Analysis.
- Median Calculation.
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2018277118
Other: shh2960
 Degree: -

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Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  Other : PNAS
  Other : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA
  Abbreviation : Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington, D.C. : National Academy of Sciences
Pages: e2018277118 Volume / Issue: 118 (23) Sequence Number: e2018277118 Start / End Page: 1 - 6 Identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925427230