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  Dissociating sub-processes of aftereffects of completed intentions and costs to the ongoing task in prospective memory: A mouse-tracking approach

Kurtz, M., Scherbaum, S., Walser, M., Kanske, P., & Möschl, M. (2022). Dissociating sub-processes of aftereffects of completed intentions and costs to the ongoing task in prospective memory: A mouse-tracking approach. Memory & Cognition. doi:10.3758/s13421-022-01289-z.

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 Creators:
Kurtz, Marcel1, Author
Scherbaum, Stefan1, Author
Walser, Moritz1, Author
Kanske, Philipp1, 2, Author              
Möschl, Marcus1, Author
Affiliations:
1Faculty of Psychology, TU Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Research Group Social Stress and Family Health, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3025667              

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Free keywords: Commission errors; Costs; Delay theory; Intention deactivation; Monitoring; Mouse tracking; Prospective memory; Spontaneous retrieval
 Abstract: In the present study, we used mouse tracking to investigate two processes underlying prospective memory (PM) retrieval: First, we aimed to explore to what extent spontaneous retrieval of already completed PM intentions is supported by reflexive-associative and discrepancy-plus-search processes. Second, we aimed to disentangle whether costs to an ongoing task during the pursuit of a PM intention are associated with presumably resource-demanding monitoring processes or with a presumably resource-sparing strategic delay of ongoing-task responses. Our third aim was to explore the interaction of processes underlying costs to the ongoing task and processes of spontaneous retrieval. Our analyses replicated response-time patterns from previous studies indicating aftereffects of completed intentions and costs to ongoing-task performance, as well as increased aftereffects while pursuing a PM intention. Notably, based on our mouse-tracking analyses, we argue that aftereffects of completed intentions are best explained by a reflexive initiation of an already completed intention. If the completed intention is not performed in its entirety (i.e., no commission error), the reflexive initiation of the completed intention is followed by a subsequent movement correction that most likely represents a time-consuming response-verification process. Regarding performance costs in the ongoing task, our analyses suggest that actively pursuing a PM intention most likely leads to a strategic delay of ongoing activities. Lastly, we found that pursuing a novel PM task after intention completion exacerbated orienting responses to all deviant stimuli, exacerbated the readiness to initiate the completed intention reflexively, and substantially prolonged the response-verification process following this reflexive intention retrieval.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-02-072022-02-25
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3758/s13421-022-01289-z
Other: online ahead of print
PMID: 35212979
 Degree: -

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Title: Memory & Cognition
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Psychonomic Society Inc.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0090-502X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925461133