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  Interhemispheric brain communication and the evolution of turn-taking in mammals

Ravignani, A., Lumaca, M., & Kotz, S. A. (2022). Interhemispheric brain communication and the evolution of turn-taking in mammals. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 10: 916956. doi:10.3389/fevo.2022.916956.

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 Creators:
Ravignani, Andrea1, 2, Author
Lumaca, Massimo2, Author
Kotz, Sonja A.3, 4, Author                 
Affiliations:
1Comparative Bioacoustics Group, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Clinical Medicine, Center for Music in the Brain, Aarhus University, Denmark, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Neuropsychology and Psychopharmacology, Maastricht University, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
4Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Bioacoustics; Brain connectivity; Turn-taking; Time; Music cognition; Speech science
 Abstract: In the last 20 years, research on turn-taking and duetting has flourished in at least three, historically separate disciplines: animal behavior, language sciences, and music cognition. While different in scope and methods, all three ultimately share one goal—namely the understanding of timed interactions among conspecifics. In this perspective, we aim at connecting turn-taking and duetting across species from a neural perspective. While we are still far from a defined neuroethology of turn-taking, we argue that the human neuroscience of turn-taking and duetting can inform animal bioacoustics. For this, we focus on a particular concept, interhemispheric connectivity, and its main white-matter substrate, the corpus callosum. We provide an overview of the role of corpus callosum in human neuroscience and interactive music and speech. We hypothesize its mechanistic connection to turn-taking and duetting in our species, and a potential translational link to mammalian research. We conclude by illustrating empirical venues for neuroethological research of turn-taking and duetting in mammals.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-04-102022-06-232022-07-29
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fevo.2022.916956
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Grant ID : DNRF117
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Funding organization : Danish National Research Foundation

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Title: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne : Frontiers Media
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 Sequence Number: 916956 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2296-701X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2296-701X