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Whole-genome sequencing of multiple Arabidopsis thaliana populations

MPS-Authors
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Stegle,  O
Former Research Group Machine Learning and Computational Biology, Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Lippert,  C
Former Research Group Machine Learning and Computational Biology, Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Borgwardt,  K
Former Research Group Machine Learning and Computational Biology, Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Weigel,  D
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Cao, J., Schneeberger, K., Ossowski, S., Günther, T., Bender, S., Fitz, J., et al. (2011). Whole-genome sequencing of multiple Arabidopsis thaliana populations. Nature Genetics, 43(10), 956-963. doi:10.1038/ng.911.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B99E-B
Abstract
The plant Arabidopsis thaliana occurs naturally in many different habitats throughout Eurasia. As a foundation for identifying genetic variation contributing to adaptation to diverse environments, a 1001 Genomes Project to sequence geographically diverse A. thaliana strains has been initiated. Here we present the first phase of this project, based on population-scale sequencing of 80 strains drawn from eight regions throughout the species' native range. We describe the majority of common small-scale polymorphisms as well as many larger insertions and deletions in the A. thaliana pan-genome, their effects on gene function, and the patterns of local and global linkage among these variants. The action of processes other than spontaneous mutation is identified by comparing the spectrum of mutations that have accumulated since A. thaliana diverged from its closest relative 10 million years ago with the spectrum observed in the laboratory. Recent species-wide selective sweeps are rare, and potentially deleterious mutations are more common in marginal populations.