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Journal Article

Chip electrophoresis of active banana ingredients with label-free detection utilizing deep UV native fluorescence and mass spectrometry

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Schulze,  Philipp
Service Department Schulze (GC, HPLC), Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Ohla, S., Schulze, P., Fritzsche, S., & Belder, D. (2011). Chip electrophoresis of active banana ingredients with label-free detection utilizing deep UV native fluorescence and mass spectrometry. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 399(5), 1853-1857. doi:10.1007/s00216-010-4557-z.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0014-CA4A-D
Abstract
In the present work, we report on a rapid and straightforward approach for the determination of biologically active compounds in bananas applying microchip electrophoresis (MCE). For this purpose, we applied label-free detection utilizing deep UV fluorescence detection with excitation at 266 nm. Using this approach, we could identify dopamine and serotonin, their precursors tryptophan and tyrosine and also the isoquinoline alkaloid salsolinol in less than 1 min. In bananas, after 10 days of ripening, we additionally found the compound levodopa which is a metabolite of the tyrosine pathway. Quantitative analysis of extracts by external calibration revealed concentrations of serotonin, tryptophan, and tyrosine from 2.7 to 7.6 μg/mL with relative standard deviations of less than 3.5%. The corresponding calibration plots showed good linearity with correlation coefficients higher than 0.985. For reliable peak assignment, the compounds were also analyzed by coupling chip electrophoresis with mass spectrometry. This paper demonstrates exemplarily the applicability of MCE with native fluorescence detection for rapid analysis of natural compounds in fruits and reveals the potential of chip-based separation systems for the analysis of complex mixtures.