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Role of PI3K in the generation and survival of B cells

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Werner,  Markus
Research Group and Chair of Molecular Immunology of the University of Freiburg, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Hobeika,  Elias
Research Group and Chair of Molecular Immunology of the University of Freiburg, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

Hassan,  Jumaa
Max Planck Society;

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Werner, M., Hobeika, E., & Hassan, J. (2010). Role of PI3K in the generation and survival of B cells. Immunological Reviews, 237, 55-71.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-8EF2-5
Abstract
Engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) or its precursor, the pre-BCR, induces a cascade of biochemical reactions that regulate the differentiation, selection, survival, and activation of B cells. This cascade is initiated by receptor-associated tyrosine kinases that activate multiple downstream signaling pathways. Since it is required for metabolism, cell growth, development, and survival, the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent pathways represents a crucial event of BCR/pre-BCR signaling. The phosphorylated substrates of the PI3K promote specific recruitment of selected signaling proteins to the plasma membrane, where important signaling complexes are formed to mediate the above-mentioned biological processes. Here, we review the principles of PI3K signaling and highlight the role of an important PI3K-driven module in VDJ recombination of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes during early B-cell development as compared with class switch recombination of Ig genes in mature B cells after activation by specific antigens. Furthermore, we discuss the role of PI3K in the survival of mature B cells, which is strictly dependent on BCR expression and basal BCR signaling.