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How to control cyclic nucleotide signaling by light

MPS-Authors
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Jansen,  Vera
Department of Molecular Sensory Systems, Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar), Max Planck Society;

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Jikeli,  Jan
Department of Molecular Sensory Systems, Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar), Max Planck Society;

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Wachten,  Dagmar
Max Planck Research Group Molecular Physiology, Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar), Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Jansen, V., Jikeli, J., & Wachten, D. (2017). How to control cyclic nucleotide signaling by light. Current Opinion in Biotechnology, 48, 15-20. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2017.02.014.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-AF54-7
Abstract
Highlights - Optogenetics controls cyclic nucleotide signaling with spatio-temporal resolution. - Genetic-engineering creates new tools by combining photosensory and effector domains. - Optogenetic control of cyclic nucleotide signaling controls physiological functions. Abstract Optogenetics allows to non-invasively manipulate cellular functions with spatio-temporal precision by combining genetic engineering with the control of protein function by light. Since the discovery of channelrhodopsin has pioneered the field, the optogenetic toolkit has been ever expanding and allows now not only to control neuronal activity by light, but rather a multitude of other cellular functions. One important application that has been established in recent years is the light-dependent control of second messenger signaling. The optogenetic toolkit now allows to control cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling by light in vitro and in vivo.