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Brain or cardiovascular oscillation: ultra-slow oscillations under 0.01 Hz detected by resting-state fMRI

MPS-Authors
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Pais Roldán,  P
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Stelzer,  J
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Jiang,  Y
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Yu,  X
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Pais Roldán, P., Edlow, B., Stelzer, J., Jiang, Y., & Yu, X. (2018). Brain or cardiovascular oscillation: ultra-slow oscillations under 0.01 Hz detected by resting-state fMRI. Poster presented at Joint Annual Meeting ISMRM-ESMRMB 2018, Paris, France.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-821F-A
Abstract
A high amplitude slow wave component of frequency 0.005 to 0.012 Hz was observed in multiple resting state fMRI scans of the rat brain under different anesthetics. These ultra-slow waves were localized predominantly in the hypothalamus. We hypothesize that these ultra-slow oscillations might have a neurological origin and may contribute to the analysis of resting state connectivity, which is currently limited to frequencies above 0.01 Hz . Future studies should investigate the origin of these oscillations with an independent measure (e.g. calcium imaging) and the implications of their incorporation into the analysis of rs-fMRI.