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The QUIC Fix for Optimal Video Streaming

MPS-Authors
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Palmer,  Mirko
Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons229061

Krüger,  Thorben
Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons229065

Chandrasekaran,  Balakrishnan
Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons211491

Feldmann,  Anja
Internet Architecture, MPI for Informatics, Max Planck Society;

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arXiv:1809.10270.pdf
(Preprint), 2MB

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Citation

Palmer, M., Krüger, T., Chandrasekaran, B., & Feldmann, A. (2018). The QUIC Fix for Optimal Video Streaming. Retrieved from http://arxiv.org/abs/1809.10270.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-BFC0-E
Abstract
Within a few years of its introduction, QUIC has gained traction: a
significant chunk of traffic is now delivered over QUIC. The networking
community is actively engaged in debating the fairness, performance, and
applicability of QUIC for various use cases, but these debates are centered
around a narrow, common theme: how does the new reliable transport built on top
of UDP fare in different scenarios? Support for unreliable delivery in QUIC
remains largely unexplored.
The option for delivering content unreliably, as in a best-effort model,
deserves the QUIC designers' and community's attention. We propose extending
QUIC to support unreliable streams and present a simple approach for
implementation. We discuss a simple use case of video streaming---an
application that dominates the overall Internet traffic---that can leverage the
unreliable streams and potentially bring immense benefits to network operators
and content providers. To this end, we present a prototype implementation that,
by using both the reliable and unreliable streams in QUIC, outperforms both TCP
and QUIC in our evaluations.