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Reading out Fisher information from the zeros of the point spread function

MPS-Authors

Paúr,  M.
External, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Max Planck Society;

Stoklasa,  B.
External, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Max Planck Society;

Koutný,  D.
External, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Max Planck Society;

Řeháček,  J.
External, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Max Planck Society;

Hradil,  Z.
External, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Max Planck Society;

Grover,  J.
External, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Max Planck Society;

Krzic,  A.
External, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Max Planck Society;

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Sanchez-Soto,  L. L.
Quantumness, Tomography, Entanglement, and Codes, Leuchs Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Paúr, M., Stoklasa, B., Koutný, D., Řeháček, J., Hradil, Z., Grover, J., et al. (2019). Reading out Fisher information from the zeros of the point spread function. Optics Letters, 44(12), 3114-3117.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-DF2D-E
Abstract
We show that, for optical systems whose point spread functions exhibit isolated zeros, the information one can gain about the separation between two incoherent point light sources does not scale quadratically with the separation (which is the distinctive dependence causing Rayleigh’s curse) but only linearly. Moreover, the dominant contribution to the separation information comes from regions in the vicinity of these zeros. We experimentally confirm this idea, demonstrating significant superresolution using natural or artificially created spectral doublets.