English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

An assessment of eddy current sensitivity and correction in single-shot diffusion-weighted imaging

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons19784

Koch,  Martin A.
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19896

Norris,  David G.
MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Koch, M. A., & Norris, D. G. (2000). An assessment of eddy current sensitivity and correction in single-shot diffusion-weighted imaging. Physics in Medicine and Biology, 45(12), 3821-3832.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-9C72-C
Abstract
Artefacts caused by eddy currents are a major problem in diffusion weighted imaging. This is particularly acute in experiments in which a number of images with differing degrees of diffusion weighting and/or differently oriented diffusion-weighting gradients need to be combined. The echo-planar imaging sequence is particularly sensitive to the effects of residual eddy currents, especially due to the low bandwidth in the phase-encoding direction. Two published schemes are investigated regarding the effectiveness of eddy current correction. That of Jezzard et al (1998 Magn. Reson. Med. 39 801-12) requires the acquisition of additional experimental data in order to perform a post-acquisition correction, whereas that of Wider et al (1994 J. Magn. Reson. A 108 255-8) attempts to reduce the eddy currents directly. It is found that the latter experiment gives a somewhat superior performance and a combination of the two approaches results in an almost complete elimination of artefact. An alternative single-shot imaging experiment to echo-planar imaging is given by sequences based on fast spin-echo methods, which should be insensitive to the effects of constant eddy currents. It is shown that the intrinsic eddy-current-related artefact level in such experiments is indeed low, residual artefacts being attributed to eddy current decay during the echo train. In situations of poor main magnetic field homogeneity or large eddy currents such sequences may be gainfully used instead of echo-planar imaging.